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The Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering degree requires a total of minimum 125 credit hours and a minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of at least 2.00.

  • Engineering Courses (53 credit hours):
  • Technical Electives (TE) (15 credit hours): See section Technical Elective Program for Industrial Engineering Students for details on TE program.
  • Mathematics and Science Requirement (32 credit hours): MA 165, MA 166, MA 261, MA 265, MA 266, CHM 115, CS 159, PHYS 172 and PHYS 241.
  • Liberal Arts Requirement (25 credit hours):
    • English Language and Communication Skills (10 credit hours): ENGL 100, ENGL 106 and COM 114.
    • General Education Requirement (15 credit hours): Students must satisfy the requirements of the General Education as per the following conditions:
      1. Courses must be drawn from the following General Education areas at AUM: Speech and Communication, English Language and Literature, History, Fine Arts, Physical Education, Self-Development and Life Style, Culinary Arts, Ethics, Social Sciences, Psychological Sciences, Natural Sciences, Child Development and Family Studies, Economics and Philosophy (please refer to Course Catalogue, General Education section).
      2. In order to ensure sufficient exposure to General Education topics, unless otherwise specified by the degree requirements of the academic major, the student cannot take more than 2 courses from the same area/sub-area as, as shown in tables below:
      3.  

        Area Maximum Courses to Take
        English Language and Literature 2
        History 2
        Physical Education 2
        Culinary Arts 2
        Ethics 2
        Psychological Sciences 2
        Natural Sciences 2
        Child Development and Family Studies 2
        Economics 2
        Philosophy 2
        Area Sub-Area Maximum Courses to Take
        Fine Arts Arts and Design 2
        Theatre 2
        Music 2
        Fashion and Apparel Design 2
        Photography and Media 2
        Self-Development and Life Style       Academic and Career Skills Development 2
        Character and Leadership Skills Development 2
        Life Management Development 2
        Development of Thinking Skills 2
        Technology and Innovation 2

         

      4. Courses that are already required under other category General Education requirement:
        1. cannot be considered as a General Education course;
        2. do not count towards the 2-course limit in General Education requirement.
Technical Elective Program for Industrial Engineering Students

In general, a technical elective is a course that develops new professional skills and/or builds upon previously obtained skills. Courses must focus on the development of skills in engineering, mathematics, business, or selected natural or social sciences.

Students are encouraged to treat the selection of technical elective courses in a structured way. Strategies for choosing technical elective courses are provided below in subsection (Developing a Coherent Curriculum Plan). Students are encouraged to select technical elective courses based on their career objectives.

Technical Elective Requirements (TE)

The following requirements are specified for the technical elective program. These are the most basic requirements. Each IE student is required to take 15 credit hours of technical electives to complete their degree requirements. Every course taken as a technical elective must be taken for a letter grade.

1. IE Courses

Students are required to complete at least 6 of the 15 required technical elective credit hours with courses originated by the IE department. These courses are referred to as IE technical electives. There are additional guidelines as follows:

  1. IE 500 level courses;
  2. IE 490 courses; any course with this listing must have special approval by the IE Department to be considered for technical elective credit.
  3. IE 499 (Reserved for Engineering Honors students; up to 6 credit hours).
  4. IE 495 (Reserved for Co-Op / internship students (if any); student must complete 3 semesters to earn TE credit)
  5. IE 600 level courses; these require permission of instructor and the IE Department. Students must have a cumulative GPA of 3.2 or higher.

Students are encouraged to consult the list of pre-approved technical electives contained in the “Emphasis Area” section below.

2. Non-IE courses

Students in IE are encouraged to choose technical elective courses from outside the department if such courses align with their career goals. Each IE student has the option to take up to 9 credit hours of non-IE courses to complete the technical elective requirements.   The general criteria for non-IE courses that may be considered for TE credit are provided below. Approval of TE course falls under IE Department.

  1. 300-level or higher course taken in any other engineering major that are not duplicates of IE courses.
  2. PHYS courses at a level higher than PHYS 241
  3. CHM courses at a level higher than CHM 116
  4. MA courses more advanced than MA 301
Developing a Coherent Curriculum Plan

Each student in the Industrial Engineering program should strive to create a plan for their education that maximizes the opportunities available to them as AUM students. AUM offers a number of courses that count towards their elective requirements. Elective courses (regardless of their classification) should not be considered “space-filling” courses. Each course taken can be selected to fulfill a desire to obtain a specific skill-set, and/or satisfy a desire for non-career related interests. In many cases, a series of elective courses can be selected to satisfy special interests.

Selecting electives according to a coherent plan is always preferred compared with a random selection of courses. There are many ways to develop a coherent plan, an example is given in the subsection “emphasis areas” Alternative approaches should be discussed with the student’s academic advisor. Students should have a clear direction in mind (e.g., career goal) to allow the academic advisor to provide greater assistance in selecting potential courses.

Emphasis Areas

The IE program is developing several “emphasis areas” you may use to enhance your curriculum and guide your course selection decisions. Most of these emphasis areas focus on the usage of technical elective courses. Other emphasis areas may involve taking general education courses in conjunction with technical electives. Current emphasis areas include the following:

  • Human Factors
  • Financial Engineering
  • Operations Research
  • Production and Management Systems

Note that some of the emphasis areas correspond to core areas of the current IE curriculum. Students may choose to increase their knowledge of a core area with their technical (and general education) electives. The details contained are focused on developing skills necessary for each emphasis area and provides a listing of courses that provide the necessary skills, or build upon skills developed in the core IE curriculum.

Each emphasis area is strictly meant to be a guide for students when selecting courses (and potential career paths). No record of you completing the “requirements” of an emphasis area will be noted on your final transcript. However, some pursuing an emphasis area may result in a student completing the requirements for a minor, if offered.

1. Human Factors Emphasis Area

The field of Human Factors in Industrial Engineering focuses on the design of tools, machines, systems, tasks, jobs and environments for safe, comfortable and effective human involvement and interaction. The field is characterized by the systematic application of knowledge about sensory, perceptual, mental and psychomotor characteristics. Industrial engineers with a Human Factors background are better able to create designs that take into account human abilities and limitations, both physical and cognitive. Physical applications include the design of working environments that are safe and comfortable taking into consideration typical as well as handicapped physical human characteristics. Cognitive applications take into account the ways humans perceive, understand, and react to stimuli – and work to support safe, efficient, and expedient responses. Designs by Human Factors engineers aim to enhance operational use while simultaneously improving the quality of working life. Human Factors expertise is desired in industries requiring frequent interactions between humans and systems, such as the transportation, manufacturing, and healthcare industries. Example applications include laying out effective computerized information displays for doctors in operating rooms, designing ways that handicapped individuals can productively operate vehicles, determining mechanisms to keep workers safe in machining operations, and creating software logic to determine if drivers are impaired – and then processes to safely override impaired drivers’ actions.

Human Factors specialists have extensive knowledge of:

  • Human perception and cognition
  • Physical and physiological characteristics of humans
  • Human computer interaction
  • Ergonomics (study of work processes)

Human Factors specialists have effective technical skills in:

  • Work measurement
  • Job and task design and analysis
  • Modeling and problem-solving
  • Design of experiments

Courses

Courses taken from the following groupings help to provide students with a deeper understanding of human factors. The courses listed below are listed in Course Catalogue. They are meant to provide guidance as to what a student might take if they are interested in this emphasis area. The list of courses below is not exhaustive. In addition, the regularity of offerings of the listed courses is not guaranteed. Some courses are offered every semester, every other semester, or every other year. Other courses may have been offered at some point, but may not be offered again for a while, and we keep them in this list in hopes they will be offered again.

A. Statistics and Design of Experiments

IE 330: Probability and Statistics in Engineering II (REQ)

IE 533: Industrial Applications of Statistics (TE)

STAT 512: Applied Regression Analysis (TE)

STAT 514: Design of Experiments (TE)

B. Ergonomics

IE 386: Work Analysis and Design I (REQ)

IE 556: Job Design (TE)

IE 558: Safety Engineering (TE)

PSY 272: Introduction to Industrial-Organizational Psychology (TE)

C. Human Perception and Cognition

IE 486: Work Analysis and Design II (REQ)

IE 559: Cognitive Engineering of Interactive Software (TE)

IE 577: Human Factors in Engineering (TE)

PSY 310: Sensory and Perceptual Processes (TE)

D. Characteristics of Humans

PSY 314: Introduction to Learning (TE)

PSY 333: Motivation (TE)

PPSY 475: Work Motivation and Job Satisfaction (TE)

PSY 511: Psychophysics (TE)

2. Financial Engineering Emphasis Area

Financial engineering is a multidisciplinary field that deals primarily with financial instruments, especially derivative securities. The field applies engineering methodologies to problems in finance, and employs financial theory and applied mathematics, as well as computation and the practice of programming to make pricing, hedging, trading and portfolio management decisions.

Utilizing various derivative securities and other methods, financial engineering aims to precisely control the financial risk (both market and credit) that an entity takes on. Methods can be employed to take on substantial risks under certain events, or largely eliminate other risks by utilizing combinations of derivative and other securities. Financial engineering can be applied to many different types of currencies and pricing options. These include equity, fixed income such as bonds, commodities such as oil or gold, as well as derivatives, swaps, futures, forwards, options, and embedded options. Industrial Engineering graduates bring a unique perspective to these financial analyses due to the nature of the discipline and the techniques and skills acquired as part of the Industrial Engineering curriculum. Because of the breadth of engineering education and the mathematical focus of much of the discipline, Industrial Engineering graduates frequently find good opportunities with banks, financial management and consulting companies, and other firms that deal with securities and/or perform quantitative analyses.

Financial engineering specialists have extensive knowledge of:

  • Financial mathematics
  • Stochastic processes
  • Optimization
  • Simulation
  • Economics

Financial engineering specialists have effective technical skills in:

  • Programming
  • Data manipulation and analysis
  • Modeling and problem-solving

Courses

Courses taken from the following groupings help to provide students with a deeper understanding of financial engineering. The courses listed below are listed in the course catalogue. They are meant to provide guidance as to what a student might take if they are interested in this emphasis area. The list of courses below is not exhaustive. In addition, the regularity of offerings of the listed courses is not guaranteed. Some courses are offered every semester, every other semester, or every other year. Other courses may have been offered at some point, but may not be offered again for a while, and we keep them in this list in hopes they will be offered again.

A. Basics of Financial instruments

IE 544: Introduction to Financial Engineering (TE)

B. Modeling and Problem-Solving

  • Differential Equations:

MA 266: Ordinary Differential Equations (REQ)

MA 303: Differential Equations and Partial Differential Equations for Engineering and the Sciences (TE)

MA 428: Introduction to Fourier Analysis (TE)

  • Statistics:

IE 230: Probability and Statistics in Engineering I (REQ)

IE 330: Probability and Statistics in Engineering II (REQ)

STAT 420: Introduction to Time Series (TE)

STAT 512: Applied Regression Analysis (TE)

  • Stochastic Modeling:

IE 336: Operations Research – Stochastic Models (REQ)

IE 536: Stochastic Models in Operations Research (TE)

C. Simulation and Programming

CE 462: Object-Oriented Programming in C++ and Java (TE)

IE 581: Simulation Design and Analysis (TE)

CS 314: Numerical Methods (TE)

D. Economics

IE 343: Engineering Economics (REQ)

3. Operations Research Emphasis Area

Operations Research (OR) is the discipline of applying advanced analytical methods to support decision making. It is also sometimes referred to as Management Science or Decision Science. The discipline draws on knowledge from mathematical and computing sciences to analyze complex decision-making problems with the goal of creating optimal solutions.

Operations Research finds application to a wide variety of problems such as: determining what petroleum products to make out of which crude oils, selecting the best path to take in transportation networks, identifying the best product placements in retail establishments, scheduling operating rooms in hospitals, optimizing financial plans for investment companies, ensuring appropriate inventory levels for spare parts manufacturers, and many, many more.

Operations Research techniques are applied to a variety of different business functions ranging from finance to manufacturing and marketing, and they provide significant benefits in almost every industry. As such, Industrial Engineers with an OR focus have a wealth of career opportunities. OR Specialists can be found in healthcare, automotive, energy, metals, and discrete parts manufacturing industries, to name a few; they are also prevalent in the government sector helping analyze issues relating to defense, health, environment, and other issues. It should be noted that many OR-focused careers require students to possess an advanced degree. The courses listed below help to prepare students for advanced studies in OR. Operations Research specialists have extensive knowledge of:

  • Mathematical modeling and analysis
  • Probability and statistics
  • Optimization
  • Simulation

Operations Research specialists have effective technical skills in:

  • Programming
  • Data manipulation and analysis
  • Modeling and problem-solving

Courses

Courses taken from the following groupings help to provide students with a deeper understanding of Operations Research. The courses listed below are listed in the Course Catalogue. They are meant to provide guidance as to what a student might take if they are interested in this emphasis area. The list of courses below is not exhaustive. In addition, the regularity of offerings of the listed courses is not guaranteed. Some courses are offered every semester, every other semester, or every other year. Other courses may have been offered at some point, but may not be offered again for a while, and we keep them in this list in hopes they will be offered again.

A. Simulation

IE 580: System Simulation (TE)

IE 581: Simulation Design and Analysis (TE)

B. Optimization

IE 335: Operations Research – Optimization (REQ)

IE 535: Linear Programming (TE)

IE 538: Nonlinear Optimization Algorithms and Models (TE)

IE 634: Integer Programming (TE)

C. Mathematical Modeling and Analysis

IE 230: Probability and Statistics in Engineering I (REQ)

IE 336: Operations Research – Stochastic Models (REQ)

IE 536: Stochastic Models in Operations Research (TE)

MA 341: Foundations of Analysis (TE)

MA 375: Introduction to Discrete Mathematics (TE)

D. Programming and Problem-solving

CS 314: Numerical Methods (TE)

4. Production and Management Systems Emphasis Area

The Production and Management Systems emphasis area focuses on the overall production and distribution of goods and services. The specialization aims to continuously improve material flow in a manner that enhances the quality of the final product and service while reducing the costs and waste to producers, workers and consumers. Industrial Engineering applications that fall under this emphasis include production planning, scheduling, and control; robotic design and implementation; materials handling, logistics, and storage systems design and control; and facilities location and design. As such, IEs with this focus are found in all sorts of diverse production and supply chain environments all over the world: automotive, electronics, healthcare materials, pharmaceuticals, energy system components, package delivery, etc. Industrial Engineers with a Production and Management Systems background often are involved with quality control using statistical techniques for productivity improvement. In addition, they frequently use operations research techniques to solve production problems that require an optimal blending of economic, human, and physical resources. Production systems specialists have extensive knowledge of:

  • Six sigma, total quality management, just-in-time
  • Facilities design
  • Optimization
  • Simulation

Production systems specialists have effective technical skills in:

  • Programming
  • Data manipulation and analysis
  • Modeling and problem-solving

Courses

Courses taken from the following groupings help to provide students with a deeper understanding of production and management systems. The courses listed below are listed in the course catalogue. They are meant to provide guidance as to what a student might take if they are interested in this emphasis area. The list of courses below is not exhaustive. In addition, the regularity of offerings of the listed courses is not guaranteed. Some courses are offered every semester, every other semester, or every other year. Other courses may have been offered at some point, but may not be offered again for a while, and we keep them in this list in hopes they will be offered again.

A. Quality Management and Control

IE 330: Probability and Statistics in Engineering II (REQ)

IE 530: Quality Control (TE)

IE 533: Industrial Applications of Statistics (TE)

MGMT 405: Six Sigma and Quality Management (TE)

IE 566: Production Management and Control (TE)

STAT 513: Statistical Quality Control (TE)

STAT 514: Design of Experiments (TE)

B. Simulation

IE 580: Systems Simulation (TE)

IE 581: Simulation Design and Analysis (TE)

C. Design and Analysis of Production Systems

IE 383: Integrated Production Systems I (REQ)

IE 484: Integrated Production Systems II (TE)

IE 582: Advanced Facilities Design (TE)

IE 583: Design and Evaluation of Material Handling Systems (TE)

IE 579: Design and Control of Production and Manufacturing Systems (TE)